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Thursday, February 7, 2013

Do you really want to be an organ donor?


January 8, 2013

Do you really want to be an organ donor?

By Paul A. Byrne, M.D.





Life on earth continues until true death. Prior to the desire to get organs for transplantation, no one was declared dead with a beating heart, circulation, or breathing. Every organ for transplantation is taken from a living person. Would anyone with common sense believe that a cadaver, a dead body, would have organs that could be transplanted?

Every organ for transplantation is taken from a living person with a beating heart, circulation and respiration. When the heart is taken for transplantation, the donor is killed. "Brain death" was concocted to get beating hearts and other vital organs for transplantation. A living body can become a dead body only by going through true death (L. mors vera); what then remains is a cadaver. A vital organ that occurs singly, e.g., the heart, cannot be transplanted from a cadaver. Donors must be living. Much information about these significant matters of life and death is kept from the public. What you do not know can kill you. Lack of informed consent is no consent. How much information were you given at the license bureau before you answered the question, "Do you wish to be an organ donor?" (...)

Continue reading: http://www.renewamerica.com/columns/byrne/130108


P.S. *gasp* That...doctor's...name...is my principal's name! (At least the Paul Byrne part...I think.)

3 comments:

  1. I am signed up as an organ donor, even after having already known these risks.

    About six months to a year ago, the Discover magazine published a similar article to this. In the article was discussed the true lengths doctors have gone to in securing organs, sometimes even ignoring fairly clear evidence that the patient's brain is still active.

    Does this give me cause for concern ? Yes. Will it stop me from being an organ donor? No.

    The likelihood that I will be in a position to donate any critical organs is relatively small. If I am in that situation, and it's highly unlikely that I would recover, I would rather that my last act on this Earth be to potentially save or help the lives of as many others as possible.

    To this end, everyone close to me knows my wishes: if there is no likelihood of my recovery, donate every part of my body that someone can use, and cremate the rest.

    As a Christian (not Catholic - Reformed), I want my death to mean something, if it can. If I can save the life of even one person when I die, then my death meant something.

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  2. Christ's command is very clear, "Thou shalt not kill."

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  3. Under this command, we are forbidden to take our own lives or the lives of others. We do not own our bodies to dispose of them as we wish.

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